Grave News Clips

George Washington's Gravestone

It will surprise you and touch your heart when you see it--the epitaph on the gravestone of George Washington. As you approach the grave, you may imagine that it will take a big stone to mark properly the resting place of this tremendous man. And on that stone you will expect many striking truths concerning this giant of history. He was the commanding General of the Continental armies, the First President of the United States, and the Father of his country. But you will likely be a little awed when at last you look down upon the small, plain stone that marks his grave. On that stone is engraved the name George Washington, the date of his birth and the date of his death. And at the bottom of the stone are these words,

"Jesus said, I am the Resurrection and the Life; he that believeth in Me, though he were dead, yet shall he live." John XI:XXV

The Tree At Lady Ann's Grave

In Tewin churchyard, a short distance from King's Cross Station, in England, stands a great four-trunked tree growing out of a grave. Its presence there has given rise to much speculation among the residents of that section. The grave from which it grows is that of Lady Anne Grimston.
Is the tree a monument to a woman's disbelief or did it happen to grow there merely by chance? Nobody knows.
Lady Anne Grimston did not believe in life after death. When she lay dying in her palatial home, she said to a friend, "I shall live again as surely as a tree will grow from my body."
She was buried in a marble tomb. The grave was marked by a large marble slab, & surrounded by an iron railing. Years later the marble slab was found to be moved a little. Then it cracked, & through the crack a small tree grew.
The tree continued to grow, tilting the stone & breaking the marble masonry until today it has surrounded the tomb with its roots, & has torn the railing out of the ground with its massive trunks. The tree at Lady Anne Grimston's grave is one of the largest in England.
Was it mere chance that caused the tree to grow there? Perhaps God the Almighty took her challenge.

The Snake Infested Grave

Gerald B. Winrod, who was editor of an American magazine, The Defender, related a remarkable story about an atheist who had been very bold, blatant & outspoken against God & the Bible. He had defied God by saying, "If there is a God, my grave will be infested with snakes." At the funeral it was necessary to remove a snake from the grave before the coffin could be lowered, the sexton saying that he had killed four big snakes at one time, yet never saw a snake at any other grave.
Mr. Winrod's informant said he would ask a gentleman in Ohio to give him more details, & in due course he received a further word, together with a picture of the bronze monument of the atheist, Chester Beddell, who had died in 1908 at the age of 82. The letter said, "Mr. Beddell said while living there was no God, & he never did believe in one. He did not hesitate to speak of these things. ... He built the monument years before his death. His statue is of bronze, & in his uplifted right hand there is a scroll with this inscription, "Universal Mental Liberty." Under his left foot is a scroll representing the Bible, with the inscription, "Superstition." Before his death he made this remark: "If there is a God, or any truth in the Bible, let my body be infested with snakes." Since his burial the family lot has been full of snake holes around the curbing. Snakes can be seen any day you visit the graveyard. Last year 20 of us went out on the 30th of October, & saw three snakes. The neighbours there say the more they kill, the thicker they seem to be.
Later the opportunity came to Mr. Winrod to make an observation of his own. While engaged in a conference in Youngstown, he was taken by car to North Benton. He asked an old man if he could tell him where the Beddell grave was. "Sure, everybody around here knows where Chet Beddell was buried," said the old-timer. "You can't miss it--big monument in the graveyard. Looking for snakes?"
Later, another man said, "Well, if Beddell did ask for snakes, he sure got'em!"
He & his companions came to the place in question where they saw the monument, the uplifted scroll, the other scroll under his foot, the stern bronze countenance. They approached the grave, camera in hand. Was it a hoax, or was it true? One of his companions was the first to see a snake. "Look there," he shouted. Yes! There it was. They walked round the grave & counted six snakes. His companion killed one. He photographed one. They also took other photographs. The sexton told them that he killed four that morning--he had killed as many as 20 snakes in a single day. Finally he said, "I don't know, maybe the Lord did have something to do with it."
It is a remarkable story, & only one of the many others that could be related of the danger of putting God out of the life.

--E. Matheson in Gathered Gems. Psa.14:1; 53:1

Charles Coughlin's Homecoming

Prince Edward Island, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, reported the strange news of Charles Coughlin's homecoming. He was a native of the island who in eighteen ninety-five started traveling and a few years later wound up at Galveston, Texas. He died there and was buried. On September eight, nineteen hundred and one, a terrific West Indian hurricane swept the Gulf of Mexico, and caused that historic calamity of the Southwest known as the Galveston flood. The wind blasted at a terrific velocity of a hundred and thirty-five miles an hour, and swept the raging waters over the city. The churning torrents washed out the cemetery where Charles Coughlin was buried. The water swept away the earth and the coffins, which floated out on the Gulf. Thirty-four years later, in nineteen thirty-five, a floating coffin drifted ashore at Prince Edward Island. Upon examination, they found a plate with the name of Charles Coughlin, the same man who had left his Prince Edward Island home those long years ago. Wind and current had carried the coffin from the Gulf of Mexico off Galveston for thousands of miles-all the way around into the Atlantic and up the coast to the Gulf of the St.Lawrence. An unusual way for a local boy to return home. 41. Alexander the Great, we are told, being upon his deathbed, commanded that, when he was carried forth to the grave, his hands should not be wrapped, as was usual, in the cereloths, but should be left outside the bier, so that all men might see them, and might see that they were empty; that there was nothing in them; that he, born to one empire, and the conqueror of another; the possessor while he lived, of two worlds, of the East, and of the West, and of the treasures of both, yet now when he was dead could retain not even the smallest portion of these treasures; that in this matter the poorest beggar and he were at length upon equal terms. If we live for this world, we shall go out of it empty-handed, but if we live for the next world we shall depart full-handed, "rich in faith" and soon to enter upon an eternal inheritance.

Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great, we are told, being upon his deathbed, commanded that, when he was carried forth to the grave, his hands should not be wrapped, as was usual, in the cereloths, but should be left outside the bier, so that all men might see them, and might see that they were empty; that there was nothing in them; that he, born to one empire, and the conqueror of another; the possessor while he lived, of two worlds, of the East, and of the West, and of the treasures of both, yet now when he was dead could retain not even the smallest portion of these treasures; that in this matter the poorest beggar and he were at length upon equal terms.
If we live for this world, we shall go out of it empty-handed, but if we live for the next world we shall depart full-handed, "rich in faith" and soon to enter upon an eternal inheritance.

Jimís Prayer

The story is told of a certain priest who was disturbed to see a shabbily dressed old man go into his church at noon every day and come out again after a few minutes. What could he be doing? He informed the caretaker and asked him to question the old man. After all, the place contained valuable furnishings.
"I go to pray," the man said in reply to the caretakerís questioning.
"Come, come now," said the other, "you are never long enough in the church to pray."
"Well, you see," the old man went on, "I donít know how to pray a long prayer, but every day at twelve oíclock I just come and say, ĎJesus, itís Jim.í I wait a minute and then come away. Even though itís just a little prayer, I think He hears me."

When Jim was injured some time later and taken to the hospital, he had a wonderful influence on the ward. Grumbling patients became cheerful and often the ward would ring with laughter.
"Well, Jim," said a nurse to him one day, "the men say you are responsible for this change in the ward. They say you are always happy."
"Aye, that I am. I canít help being happy. You see, itís my Visitor. Every day He makes me happy."
"Your visitor?" The nurse was puzzled. She had noticed that Jimís chair was always empty during visiting hours, for he was a lonely man, with no relatives. "Your visitor? But when does he come?"
"Every day," Jim replied, with a light in his eye. "Yes, every day at twelve oíclock He comes and stands at the foot of my bed. I see Him and He smiles and says, ĎJim, itís Jesus.í"

* * * *

The above story is a rather wellknown Christian anecdote you might say, but we, the webmasteró being familiar with "the story of Jim as related above, were very encouraged by the following update to it, sent to us by a friend of ours, who is a missionary in Thailand. He wrote us, telling us the following amazing account:

"We met a Scottish man who works here in Thailand. He received Jesus and invited us to his house for dinner. Since his name was Jimmy, we started telling him the story of "Jesus, it ís Jim!"óabout the old man who went to the church every day to pray. He interrupted us to say, that he knew the story very well; in fact, it had happened near where he lived in Scotland.
The name of the old man in question was Jimmy Meekan, he said. Our friend said he knew the cardinal who had officiated at Jimmyís funeral. He added this fascinating conclusion to the story, stating that he personally knew many witnesses, including the cardinal, who would swear on a Bible that this incident truly happened.

While Jim was seriously ill in the hospital, the doctors who were familiar with his condition were amazed at how cheerful he was and how he continually tried to cheer up the other patients. However, when Jim gave the explanation that Jesus came to daily visit him, many scoffed.
But at his funeral, while the mourners stood about his coffin, they were astonished to suddenly hear a loud voice, as it were from the sky, saying, "Jim, itís Me, Jesus!"

 

TIDBITS ON HEAVEN

What Color?
Gypsy Rodney Smith, preaching at Dallas, Texas, had a petition from coloured ministers asking for a meeting exclusively for blacks. They came in thousands. There was a good deal of punctuating of his address with 'Hallelujahs' and 'Amens.' Suddenly an aged coloured woman called out, 'Gypsy Smith, may I ask a question?'
Looking at her, he said, 'Certainly, my sister, what is it?'
'What colour are we going to be when we get to Heaven? Shall we be white or black?' Everybody was waiting breathlessly for the answer.
'My dear sister, we are going to be just like Christ,' replied Gypsy Smith. And 'Amen' rang out all over the hall.

Talk About Heaven
Charles E. Fuller once announced that he would be speaking the following Sunday on "Heaven." During that week a beautiful letter was received from an old man who was very ill. The following is part of his letter:
"Next Sunday you are to talk about Heaven. I am interested in that land, because I have held a clear title to a bit of property there for over fifty-five years. I did not buy it. It was given to me without money and without price. But the Donor purchased it for me at tremendous sacrifice. I am not holding it for speculation since the title is not transferable. It is not a vacant lot.
"For more than half a century I have been sending materials out of which the greatest Architect and Builder of the Universe has been building a home for me which will never need to be remodeled nor repaired because it will suit me perfectly, individually, and will never grow old.
"Termites can never undermine its foundations for they rest on the Rock of Ages. Fire cannot destroy it. Floods cannot wash it away. No locks nor bolts will ever be placed upon its doors, for no vicious person can ever enter that land where my dwelling stands, now almost completed and almost ready for me to enter in and abide in peace eternally, without fear of being ejected.
"There is a valley of deep shadow between the place where I live in California and that to which I shall journey in a very short time. I cannot reach my home in that City of Gold without passing through this dark valley of shadows. But I am not afraid because the best Friend I ever had went through the same valley long, long ago and drove away all its gloom. He has stuck by me through thick and thin, since we first became acquainted fifty-five years ago, and I hold His promise in printed form, never to forsake me or leave me alone. He will be with me as I walk through the valley of shadows, and I shall not lose my way when He is with me.
"I hope to hear your sermon on Heaven next Sunday from my home in Los Angeles, California, but I have no assurance that I shall be able to do so. My ticket to Heaven has no date marked for the journey-no return coupon-and no permit for baggage. Yes, I am all ready to go and I may not be here while you are talking next Sunday evening, but I shall meet you there some day."

The Results Are In Ö And We Are Not Happy
The Baltic Times
Professor Ruut Veenhoven of Erasmus University in the Netherlands has compiled a world database of happiness, measuring life expectancy against subjective life appreciation in 48 industrialized nations. Sadly, residents of the Baltic states scored among the least cheerful--and they can't blame it on the long, dark winters. Iceland ranked the happiest.
"At least we beat Russia," one Latvian said. "That's all that matters."

Saddest states:

1. Bulgaria
2. Nigeria
3. Belarus
4. Russia
5. Latvia
6. Lithuania
7. India
8. Estonia
9. Romania
10. South Africa 

JOKES

It was the German religious reformer Martin Luther who said, "If you're not allowed to laugh in Heaven, I don't want to go there."

Did you hear the one about Ö?

Did you hear the one about the rabbi, the minister and the priest who went fishing? When the fish were not biting, the rabbi and the priest got out of the boat and walked across the water to find a good spot.
The minister, too, got out of the boat, but each time he started to sink and had to clamber back on board.
"Do you think that we should tell him where the rocks are?" the priest finally said to the rabbi.

Or how about the story of the older Baptist woman who walked into a Methodist church one Sunday? The pastor asked her why she was a Baptist, and she replied that it was because her parents and grandparents had been Baptists.
"Ma'am, that's really not a good reason to be a Baptist," the preacher said. "Suppose your mother and your father, and your grandmother and your grandfather had been morons, what would you have been?"
Without batting an eye, she replied, "I guess I'd have been a Methodist."


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